Two things need to occur to end violence against women; we need women’s equality and we need to hold men accountable for their violence. Currently, society does not hold men accountable, they blame women and the systems designed to support abused women also hold women accountable or create so many barriers women give up and return to abusive situations. I believe a first step is to get men to see VAW as a man’s issue and have men hold violent men accountable for their violence while supporting women’s advocates.
— Research Participant, Traps and Gaps

Traps and Gaps: An Effectiveness Assessment of the VAW Service System in Thunder Bay and District (2007)

With financial support from the Ministry of Community and Social Services Domestic Violence Action Plan Funding Program, the Coordinating Committee published Traps and Gaps: An Effectiveness Assessment of the VAW Service System in Thunder Bay and District. Some of the insights from this research continue to guide our work together.  

The research objectives were as follows:

1. To assess the systemic response to VAW in Thunder Bay and District in order to identify gaps in service.

2. To assess differential strengths of Institutional Based Services and Community Based, Equality Seeking, Women Centred initiatives in order to identify the best methods for a cohesive joint response

3. To research the needs of women who have experienced/survived abuse living on reserve in the remote north to identify gaps in service in order to develop a protocol with local agencies to increase service from Thunder Bay and District to these women.

Read the full report here.


THE WOMAN ABUSE COMMUNITY REPORT CARD PROJECT: TOOLS TO ASSIST COMMUNITIES IN CARRYING OUT SELF-ASSESSMENTS REGARDING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THEIR RESPONSE TO WOMAN ABUSE (2004)

Funded by the Ontario Ministry of the Attorney General through the Government of Ontario Violence Against Women Prevention Initiatives, this joint project was undertaken in light of recommendations from the May/Illes and Hadley inquests, and in direct response to a recommendation from the Joint Committee on Domestic Violence's five-year strategic plan (1999).

Two tools were created: one to assess the service provision in a community, and the other to assess how effectively its coordinating committee (or other similar group) functions. The tools were then tested in London, Kenora, Owen Sound, Thunder Bay and Toronto.

READ THE FULL REPORT HERE.